Tuesday, January 29, 2008

The Last Laugh At De Paul: Associate Professor Norman Finkelstein...Multi-Millionaire

Tuesday, January 29, 2008

The Last Laugh At De Paul: Associate Professor Norman Finkelstein...Multi-Millionaire

I'm sure Professor Norman Finkelstein never planned on being a millionaire. If he had he probably would have picked a different career, or at least navigated the existing one in an entirely different way. Maybe for example, he wouldn't have exposed the Joan Peters book, From Time Immemorial (a fraudulent history of modern Israel) as the hoax that it was. Professor Chomsky did warn him after all that if he did, he and his career would be forever screwed. If he like the rest of the Zionist Academia at Princeton University had placed Political Zionism above serious scholarship, he would have returned home that evening and placed all of his research, notes and manuscripts in the dumpster. But that is not Professor Norman Finkelstein. He probably wouldn't have written The Holocaust Industry either. That clearly ruffled a few feathers. But when he took on Professor Alan Dershowitz, the Torture Professor of Harvard University and accused him of plagiarizing the work of Peters in his book, The Case for Israel, Finkelstein became a marked man. Dershowitz, the Bull Conner of the Zionist thought police was not about to let that one go. And after Beyond Chutzpah was published, notwithstanding Bull's best efforts to intimidate the University of California Press not to do so, the police dogs and fire hoses were let loose at De Paul. A campaign of Zionist terror against free thinking academics the order of the day. If our politicians are unable to resist such onslaughts, how could we expect a poor De Paul University President to do so?

So it was not surprising last summer when the Honorable Reverend Holtscheider tossed his saintly and priest like values out the window and denied Professor Finkelstein's tenure at De Paul. With academic organizations lining up behind Finkelstein, his students occupying buildings at the school, and Bull and his pals hysterical and relentless in hounding for tenure denial, what was a college president to do. Because schools like De Paul rely heavily on contributions (probably even from Zionists), the Reverend did what was politically and financially expedient. But I'm sure the legal department at the Vatican (who specialize mostly in the defense of child boffing priests) understood this decision would be made at a considerable cost.


Employment under our law is generally presumed to be at the will of the employer. An employer can fire an employee at any time for good reason or for no reason at all. They just can't fire an employee for a bad reason. A bad reason might be discrimination or harassment of some protected group. Like for example, firing a non practicing Jew for failing to adhere to Catholic saintly and priest like values. If termination violates some constitutionally based fundamental public policy, an employer may also have a wrongful termination problem. Say for example a professor is fired in retaliation for speaking truth to the Zionist Status Quo. How could a jurist believe that this would not contravene a constitutionally based public policy. Another possibility to overcome the at-will presumption, is to prove an express or implied contract, and that one should not be terminated without good cause. Is it reasonable to assume that tenure would be granted by a university, if the schools conditions are met by a professor? Should good faith be expected? How difficult should it be to establish an express or implied contract in this case? Ding, ding, ding, ding... that is the sound of striking the jack pot. And we haven't even discussed the other possibilities like defamation, fraud, and infliction of emotional distress.



I believe that in anticipation of litigation, De Paul paid Finkelstein what he otherwise would have earned over his possible remaining career at De Paul with related fringe benefits. With Finkelstein approaching his mid-fifties, I estimate his earnings and fringes over the remainder of his career at about three quarters of a million dollars. Now ordinarily, earnings in damage calculations would be reduced by earnings from alternate employment possibilities. But what university is going to hire a professor that does not display Catholic saintly and priest like values. Finkestein is damaged goods. And with all that fraud, defamation and emotional distress inflicted on him, he may never work again. To compensate Finkelstein for the bad faith openly displayed by his employer, I believe he received an additional three times his actual damages of $750,000 or $2,250,000. That seems fair under the circumstances. Now everyone knows of course that litigation is expensive. I believe that De Paul could easily have racked up defense costs of half a million to one million dollars if this matter went to trial. So we should also add to Finkelstein's prize an additional quarter million dollars for nuisance value. That would leave him with a cool $3,250,000. I believe this explains how the escalating controversy at De Paul came to such an abrupt and anti climatic end. And of course it was all made possible by Bull Dershowitz. Finkelstein always gets the better of this goof ball.


So when Finkelstein was visiting Lebanon a few weeks ago and the right wing Ziosphere was abuzz with hate over his visit, I couldn't help but smile. I think professor Finkelstein owes Dershowitz a special thanks for setting him free. Finkelstein no longer needs to worry about making a living. He can do what he pleases. He's not chained to a desk at what now can only be considered a second rate University. A University where academic freedom is unimportant. The only real losers, Finkelstein's students, who learned so well from Finkelstein that they were willing to put their degrees at risk on his behalf. And all for some quaint old notion of academic freedom and justice. Silly kids.

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