Tuesday, October 14, 2008

Neel Kashkari - Banker Lackey

http://ap.google.com/media/ALeqM5grcozMz8mcSanvWD7_hwmWkfGd9Q?size=s35 years old and an engineering degree. This is a success story that could only happen in America. A meteoric rise from obscurity to the handler of most likely over a trillion dollars. All to save the economy of not only us, but quite possibly the entire world.

Lackey - - - 1 a: footman 2 , servant b: someone who does menial tasks or runs errands for another 2: a servile follower : toady

It was a surprise that the front man for the federal reserve-globalist banking system/wall street/corrupt government scam for most of the richest people and entities in this country is not of the jewish persuasion. Very surprising that the controllers would not put one of their own in that position. It must say something of his loyalty to those who pay him. Maybe it was just an attempt at not being too obvious. Maybe they are running out of stooges to use.

Kashkari will do as he is told. Basically that is to give the money to those who least need it, those who will only use it to solidify their positions of power, those who are the enemy of the average American.

Cash 'n' carry


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/ee/CashCarryTITLE.jpg
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The eyes have it.
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10.13.2008
Tzvee's Talmudic Blog

Is Neel Kashkari Jewish?

No, Neel Kashkari is not a Jew. He is an Indian-American, born on July 30, 1973, in Akron, Ohio. He grew up in the Akron suburb of Stow, Ohio. He attended Stow–Munroe Falls schools before transferring to the Western Reserve Academy in Hudson, Ohio, from which he graduated in 1991. His parents, Chaman and Sheila Kashkari, are Hindus from Kashmir, India.

As Interim Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Financial Stability in the United States Department of the Treasury, he heads the Office of Financial Stability, the office set up to buy troubled financial assets from U.S. financial firms under the $700 billion U.S. Government Troubled Assets Relief Program.

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