Saturday, November 22, 2008

Forgetting JFK

Photobucket
Nov. 22nd, 2008

from Rocker

I damn near cried as I poured through the War Daily looking for any reference to that horrible day 45 years ago. This is what I found in the putrid magazine under "This day in History":

"In 1963, President Kennedy was shot to death while riding in a motorcade in Dallas. John B. Connally, governor of Texas, in the same limousine as Kennedy, was seriously wounded. Suspect Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested."

Yeah, the Zionist-controlled agenda-pushers wouldn't want to promote the antiwar, abolish-the-Fed, anti-
secret societies, anti-Israeli nuclear program, shatter the CIA into a thousand pieces, peace president or raise questions about his death. No what they do today is once again (in a real frightening, agenda-pushing way) is WORSHIP WAR!!! Their selectivity and omissions speak louder than any propaganda they could print (which bloggers would rip apart).

Seeing as they won't do it, let me put up a few things:

(Updated: Originally published November 29, 2006)

Anyone who even remotely believes Oswald popped off the great man with a rifle that had a defective scope is unworthy of entering into a discussion of anything. Computer models and forged historical records can "prove" anything; the man was gunned down because the established order perceived a threat in this sickly, thoughtful and empathic person the world knows as JFK.

JFK was appalled at the evil contained in the Operation Northwoods documents, and had intended to serve the people of America, not the power structure.

Come to think of it, maybe that's why he is off the list!

"In pantheon, whither JFK?" by Peter S. Canellos/Boston Globe November 28, 2006

WASHINGTON -- In the decades since his assassination 43 years ago last week, John F. Kennedy's reputation has waxed and waned, but his status as one of the signature figures of his era -- America's Camelot president -- has held up. But now, as Kennedy begins a sad retreat from living memory, the man who was hailed as the symbol of his generation may be losing his place in the American pantheon.

The Atlantic Monthly asked 10 eminent historians to rank the 100 most influential Americans of all time, and Kennedy did not make the cut. Worse, he was named on only two ballots.

These types of lists -- mixing athletes, entertainers, theologians, and others -- are always subject to challenge, and there are plenty of people on the list who are far less familiar to current-day Americans than Kennedy is.

But the list isn't short on presidents. In fact, it contains Kennedy's three immediate predecessors and his two immediate successors, meaning that every president from 1933 to 1974 is on the list except Kennedy.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt ( No. 4) and Harry Truman (21) shaped great events. Dwight Eisenhower (28) was chosen both for his World War II command and his presidency.

Kennedy's successors, Lyndon Baines Johnson (44) and Richard Nixon (99), occupied similar historical space to Kennedy, but stood on far more turbulent ground -- largely because of their own actions. Perhaps for that reason, they made the cut and Kennedy did not. Ronald Reagan, credited with ending the Cold War, clocked in at a robust 17.

"There are many . . . figures who, but for the grace of God, might have been influential rather than obscure, and who hang like shadows around their better-remembered counterparts," wrote Atlantic associate editor Ross Douthat in an essay accompanying the list.

"LBJ is shadowed by JFK, who, though hardly obscure, earned the votes of only two panelists; without an assassin's bullet, it would have been Kennedy wrestling with civil rights and Vietnam."

Or NOT! Vietnam WHY he was killed!

A University of New Hampshire historian, Ellen Fitzpatrick, said she was among the two who included Kennedy.

She ranked him at 35, and justified the selection based on his "mythic stature," the generational shift he brought to the presidency, and the historical benchmark of his assassination.

"I think the impact of Kennedy's death alone -- regardless of his impact as president -- puts him on the list," said Fitzpatrick. "If [Wal-Mart founder] Sam Walton makes the list, John F. Kennedy should be on the list."

But she said that historians tend to view historical figures in light of present values, and that Kennedy's standing has suffered because of present-day skepticism about "the optimism the '60s represented," the virtues of liberalism, and the sense of presidents as heroes.

The panelists -- who included Pulitzer Prize winners Doris Kearns Goodwin [a self-admitted plagiarist, but what the hell, she's got the rep, talking heads always on the shows, you know, typical class bullshit, which is what this society is all about] , Walter McDougall , Gordon S. Wood , and David M. Kennedy -- clearly viewed JFK as more of a phenomenon than a truly influential figure.

Throughout the '60s and most of the '70s, few people made such a distinction: Kennedy routinely topped public polls to pick the greatest presidents, and even historians placed him among the finest chief executives. In 1982, writer Garry Wills declared that America was suffering from a "Kennedy imprisonment": Voters craved leaders with Kennedy's charismatic style, which Wills considered reckless.

Now, historians seem ready to believe that Kennedy's fame was entirely a matter of style -- and of grief. In this view, ranking JFK among the top presidents would be like putting James Dean among the greatest actors or Princess Diana among the most important royalty: Any responsible historian would have to painstakingly separate fact from myth, and accomplishments from appearances.

Still, the historians may have overcorrected. By the 1980s and '90s, TV miniseries would routinely portray Kennedy as ruthless and profane; in one, Kennedy spent much of the Cuban missile crisis swearing and muttering about possible damage to his reputation.

But when tapes of the actual deliberations became public, Kennedy was solidly articulate: He solicited input from a wide range of advisers and outside specialists, deftly debated various approaches, showed respect but not too much deference to the Joint Chiefs, and crafted a combination of military actions and diplomatic thrusts that completely outmaneuvered the Soviets.

It was a textbook example of presidential leadership under perhaps the greatest pressure faced by any chief executive. Johnson and Nixon -- and others of Kennedy's successors -- could have learned from it.

Peter S. Canellos is the Globe's Washington bureau chief. National Perspective is his weekly analysis of events in the capital and beyond."

Let me put those last two paragraphs up in bold italics so you get the complete reverberations of what happened in 1962
:

"But when tapes of the actual deliberations became public, Kennedy was solidly articulate: He solicited input from a wide range of advisers and outside specialists, deftly debated various approaches, showed respect but not too much deference to the Joint Chiefs, and crafted a combination of military actions and diplomatic thrusts that completely outmaneuvered the Soviets.

It was a textbook example of presidential leadership under perhaps the greatest pressure faced by any chief executive. Johnson and Nixon -- and others of Kennedy's successors -- could have learned from it."

Perhaps the greatest pressure ever faced?

The threat of total nuclear war?

Perhaps?

What a GREAT PRESIDENT -- in stark contrast to what we have now (and are going to have judging by all the Clinton globalists and war hawks Obama is seeding his Cabinet with)!

There is no doubt; while not a saint, JFK was a great man.

That is why they cut him down!


"Our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet... we all breathe the same air... we all cherish our children's futures... and we are all mortal." -- JFK, at American University, 1963

That brought tears to my eyes.

Rest in Peace, Mr. President.

More:

"Commencement Address at American University in Washington, June 10, 1963

.... I have, therefore, chosen this time and this place to discuss a topic on which ignorance too often abounds and the truth is too rarely perceived -- yet it is the most important topic on earth: world peace.

What kind of peace do I mean? What kind of peace do we seek? Not a Pax Americana enforced on the world by American weapons of war. Not the peace of the grave or the security of the slave. I am talking about genuine peace, the kind of peace that makes life on earth worth living, the kind that enables men and nations to grow and to hope and to build a better life for their children -- not merely peace for Americans but peace for all men and women -- not merely peace in our time but peace for all time. I speak of peace because of the new face of war. Total war makes no sense in an age when great powers can maintain large and relatively invulnerable nuclear forces and refuse to surrender without resort to those forces. It makes no sense in an age when a single nuclear weapon contains almost ten times the explosive force delivered by 11 of the Allied air forces in the Second World War. It makes no sense in an age when the deadly poisons produced by a nuclear exchange would be carried by wind and water and soil and seed to the far corners of the globe and to generations yet unborn.

Today the expenditure of billions of dollars every year on weapons acquired for the purpose of making sure we never need to use the is essential to keeping the peace. But surely the acquisition of such idle stockpiles -- which can only destroy and never create -- is not the only, much less the most efficient, means of assuring peace.

I speak of peace, therefore, as the necessary rational end of rational men. I realize that the pursuit of peace is not as dramatic as the pursuit of war -- and frequently the words of the pursuer fall on deaf ears. But we have no more urgent task....

Let us reexamine our attitude toward the Soviet Union.... No government or social system is so evil that its people must be considered as lacking in virtue.... For, in the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children's future. And we are all mortal.

--
MORE--"

That goes for the MUSLIMS we are now SLAUGHTERING, too, AmeriKa!!!!! And yup, the eyes are getting a little wet. The hell with me missing him (I never knew him); the WORLD MISSES HIM and what he COULD HAVE DONE!!!!

Related: RFK Immediately Thought Brother's Assassination Was Conspiracy


~~~~~~~~~~
Also see:

JFK - Rush to Judgement & Final Judgement

No comments:

Post a Comment