Friday, December 12, 2008

Feed your babies Melamine and your pets.....leftover lab animals

What's next? Treated lumber sawdust in flour. Depleted uranium in crunchy snacks.

by Mike Adams - Natural News

Following the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's setting of a "safe" level of melamine in foods, the World Health Organization (WHO) has announced its own safety level of 0.2 mg per kilogram of body weight per day.

In other words, the WHO says that a 150-pound person could safely consume 13.6 mg of melamine per day.

That's a lot of melamine. It's almost like a nutritional supplement dose. And the scary part about all this is that neither the WHO nor the FDA has any science whatsoever to back up this "safe" consumption guideline.

Melamine is an industrial chemical that has sickened hundreds of thousands of children in China and killed babies and pets across the world. It has no place in the food supply whatsoever. For these health agencies that are supposed to be serving the public to now claim that a person can "safely" eat 13.6 mg of melamine per day, every day, is simply outrageous. It is a betrayal of the very public these agencies are supposed to serve and protect.

Without any scientific evidence whatsoever, the world's health agencies are essentially endorsing very high levels of melamine in foods. How high? If a 150-pound person eats just one chocolate bar per day, and that chocolate bar is a 50-gram bar that's contaminated with melamine, the WHO would allow an incredible 272 parts per million of melamine in the bar, which is 272 times the allowable level of melamine contamination that has been put forth by the FDA!

The FDA, you see, is outlining its melamine limits based on how much melamine is in the food. The WHO, on the other hand, is stating a limit of how much a person can consume, and the WHO limit is significantly higher than what the FDA limit would have typically exposed a person to.

What's really astonishing here, though, is not only that both the WHO and FDA think it's "safe" for babies, children and adults to consume melamine every day, but that these agencies support the daily consumption of multiple untested chemicals in combination!

For example, the FDA has declared bisphenol-A to be completely safe and has placed no consumption limit on it whatsoever. There is no limit on acrylamide consumption, either, meaning that a U.S. citizen could be consuming large amounts of melamine, bisphenol-A, acrylamides, phthalates, perchlorates and numerous other chemicals in highly toxic combinations that are all "approved" by the FDA!

I must emphasize there has been no safety testing done on melamine that could scientifically establish a "safe" consumption limit. Thus, the FDA and WHO are just blindly guessing at what a safe level might be. Consumers are guinea pigs, in other words, and if babies start dying or falling ill from all these chemicals at some later date, then they'll deal with it then (by denying they could have known the chemicals were dangerous, of course).

In other words, the health authorities of the world are now setting food safety standards in precisely the same way that a fifth-grade takes a history quiz… by guessing!

I have a radical idea: How about setting a standard that would require no industrial chemicals in the food supply?

And why is that so radical anyway? Shouldn't that just be common sense? Why are the FDA and WHO shoving chemicals down our throats and insisting they're all safe to eat?

Why have our food safety agencies become pushers of industrial chemicals?

Friday, December 12, 2008 by: Susan Thixton, citizen journalist

(NaturalNews) Millions of laboratory animals are yet used each year to test new drugs to be approved by the FDA for safety. While some labs have been discovered to provide horrific conditions for test animals, most follow the 'Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals' protocol. But have you ever thought about what happens to those test animals once the research is over? There is not an animal lover on the planet whose heart doesn't break a little when shown photos or videos of laboratory test animals. It is gut-wrenching to know that these test animals have little to no quality of life. Once the testing is complete for that animal, what happens next is even more unimaginable. Animals used for laboratory testing, filled with drugs and test diseases, can end up in pet food.

According to the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, proper disposal of test animals is as follows: "Infectious animal carcasses can be incinerated on-site or collected by a licensed contractor." In other words, used test animals would be cremated – if the laboratory has the expensive equipment to cremate test animals; or the 'licensed contractor' would be the area Rendering Facility, which provides the pet food industry with many ingredients. Many, many laboratories that use test animals are University based; struggling to make ends meet. It is unlikely that many University laboratories can afford cremation of test animals. Sadly, we must assume that most University lab test animals are rendered.

As example, the University of Illinois and Oklahoma State University both allow test animal carcasses to be rendered. The University of Illinois website mentions their renderer does not pick up dogs or cats. However, all other test animals, and the diseases and drugs in their bodies, are removed by local renderers whose end products sell to pet food manufacturers. Baylor University website states "non-hazardous carcass waste" is removed to the area landfill; however "all hazardous classified animal carcasses shall be disposed of through a contracted waste disposal vendor" – a renderer. Please take notice of the Baylor University waste protocol; non-hazardous carcass waste can be buried, but hazardous animal carcass waste is rendered.

Imagine all of the waste test animals at all of the laboratories across the country, University or otherwise. Imagine all the test drugs not yet approved for use within these animal bodies. Many, many of those test animals and test drugs are rendered, along with other waste animal material (such as 4-D livestock – dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals rejected for use in human food), and after the rendering process become ingredients in pet food.

Pet food ingredients that could possibly contain a rendered laboratory animal would be 'animal fat', 'by-product meal', 'meat and bone meal', 'meat meal' (not 'chicken meal' or 'turkey meal' or any other specific named meat meal), and 'Animal Digest'. The FDA has determined that the common pet food ingredient 'Animal Fat' to be most likely to contain a euthanizing drug, thus most likely to contain a euthanized animal. There is NO FDA information on exactly what type of euthanized animal could be in 'animal fat', nor what other drugs are in the ingredient (and in the other above listed pet food ingredients). There is NO FDA or CVM information on the health condition of animals used in these rendered pet food ingredients, nor the research data to know the health risk to pets. The FDA, despite Federal law against this, allows diseased animals and rendered laboratory animals to become pet food ingredients.

Sadly, there is no means for pet owners to know if any of these common pet food ingredients are certain to contain the remains of a test animal or drugs within that animal. Each 'batch' of rendered animal waste results in different contents of the end products; subject to what type of animals or animal waste is picked up and processed.

The rendering of laboratory test animals into pet food ingredients is simply unacceptable. Untested drugs, euthanasia drugs, and various species of test animals, all to possibly become part of a family pet's food, is inexcusable. The carcasses of these test animals and the drugs and chemicals within them should never become rendered into pet food. Please look at the label of your pet's food and treats for the ingredients 'animal fat', 'by-product meal', 'meat and bone meal', 'meat meal' (not 'chicken meal' or 'turkey meal' or any other specific named meat meal), and 'Animal Digest'; feeding your pet a food or treat with these ingredients could mean you are feeding the remains of a laboratory test animal and the drugs within that animal. Unfortunately, many Rx pet foods designed to treat a pet illness contain some of these ingredients. If your veterinarian has prescribed your pet a Rx diet, you must continue using that pet food unless the approval of another pet diet is obtained. The diet addressing an illness must be a top priority. Please consult your veterinarian before changing foods.

Wishing you and your pet the best,
Susan Thixton

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