Saturday, October 26, 2013

Drugs Inc - Stashville Tennessee


The video below is from National Geographic's Drugs Inc. series and it seems to be a fairly good representation of the middle Tennessee drug scene along with its accompanying 'drug war.'

Over the decades the good ole boys have gone from moonshine to weed to meth to pharmaceuticals, each with their own set of risks and rewards. As the grower in the video says, what should be a $100 a pound weed now is $4,000. It's the fear tax. The compensation justified by the threat not only of arrest but also of asset forfeiture. There's one scene where cops seize a high end SUV for less than 1/2 oz of marijuana, a misdemeanor. They are excited to grab such a deal. Assets are auctioned to get money for more cops and more seizures in an endless cycle for drug war profits. 

Shake 'N Bake meth is a problem with its danger of explosions, toxicity and contamination of people and property but in my little area people are arrested almost every week for it. The jails are full of them but it seems there's always someone to take their place. The DIY money and 'high' for one's own habit are too tempting. 

Still, use of meth is minor compared to the dope coming from America's major drug cartel, the pharmaceutical industry. I don't have enough fingers to count the number of folks I have known who died from these 'painkillers.' 'Dope' docs, profitable pain clinics and rogue doctors, dentists, nurses, pharmacists and medical personnel are the not so secret pushers. Drug addicted doctors are mostly hidden until they get so sloppy that it becomes inevitable they get caught. They often are back door dealers too. Even then they don't go to jail. It's rehab and a few $10,000 contributions to their local political money couriers, mostly Republican around here these days, and they a make a comeback to their 'practice.'  My family has had a couple of close encounters with addict doctors that easily could have been disastrous but luckily didn't take that turn.  I'm not for work place drug testing but for doctors and politicians I might make an exception. 

Throughout history people have always had the urge to alter their consciousness. It's just a fact. But never before have state sanctioned drug running, both 'legal' and illegal, arms trafficking to cartels and big bank money laundering combined with the 'war on drugs' created such havoc on our society. As with all wars, I'm reminded of a line from the old song... "Lord knows there's got to be a better way." 

15 comments:

  1. From Snippits and Slappits:
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-L7DQVsAxcxU/Ums5CDSmQxI/AAAAAAABuZU/PDhmpZn7pQg/s1600/drug_profits_sjpg1169.jpg

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  2. If We Tolerated Your Pot Use …

    http://thefunnyplanet.com/pic/If-we-tolerated-your-Pot-Use-12476

    The following is from the WayBack Machine, so I'll post the whole article instead of excerpts in case it can't be accessed, which sometimes occurs:

    Does Marijuana Really Kill Brain Cells?
    September 11, 2009 by Brian Breeding

    "Smoking marijuana kills brain cells." If you have ever smoked marijuana you've probably heard this myth at some point or another. But you might not know the horrible origins of this dreadful lie.

    It was Ronald Reagan who said "the most reliable scientific sources say permanent brain damage is one of the inevitable results of the use of marijuana." What were those reliable scientific sources you ask?

    In 1974, Dr. Robert G. Heath, a researcher at Tulane University in New Orleans, reported that he had found proof that marijuana caused brain damage while experimenting on monkeys. Heath reported that rhesus monkeys smoking an equivalent of 30 joints a day began to atrophy and die after just 90 days. Autopsies revealed that the monkeys who had been exposed to the marijuana smoke had more dead brain cells than the control monkeys, who had not been exposed.

    How did Heath come up with these results? What were his procedures? For six years, no one knew. It took Playboy and NORML six years of requesting and suing under the Freedom of Information Act to finally receive an accurate accounting of the procedures Heath used.

    Four monkeys were strapped into chairs with transparent plastic boxes surrounding their heads. The head chamber was sealed so that the smoke being pumped in wouldn't be lost. This also meant that the carbon monoxide couldn't escape either. Instead of the 30-joints-a-day dosage that Heath had reported, the monkeys were given the equivalent of 63 joints in five minutes, every day, for three months.

    The poor monkeys were being suffocated for five minutes at a time, on a daily basis, over a period of three months. After which they were killed so that their brains could be autopsied, and the dead brain cells caused by carbon monoxide poisoning were attributed to marijuana. This was Ronald Reagan's "reliable scientific" source.

    Heath's experiments have since been criticized for insufficient sample size and failure to control other determining factors, such as the carbon monoxide poisoning. Similar experiments, involving more monkeys and better control, have since contradicted Heath's reported findings. But sadly, the lie based on his research is still used to frighten smokers today. And will most likely continue to be used until enough people know the truth.

    It is not always wise to believe everything you read, so do the research yourself. Marijuana doesn't kill brain cells; lack of oxygen does, so everyone remember to breathe.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20100110232016/http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2159875/does_marijuana_really_kill_brain_cells.html?cat=5

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    Replies
    1. Great cartoons guys. A legal hemp bill may come up in next years TN legislature and already the corporate shills are coming out against it. I'd like to have some cheap organic hemp seeds to eat regularly myself.

      "Remember to breathe." Proper oxygenation of the blood is one of the main keys to good health.

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    2. Yep....that Tulane University has got some 'history' with monkey experiments. (Dr Mary's Monkey - by Edward T. Haslam.)

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  3. Apropos of nothing, here is a book you will like, Kenny: "The falsification of history: our distorted reality" by John Hamer.
    Sincerely,
    EV

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    Replies
    1. Hey EV, good to hear from you. Unfortunately I couldn't find a free pdf copy of the book and my local library never has any of the good stuff.

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    2. It is available on Amazon.com, and worth the money. I myself am quite stingy, so that is saying a lot. Plus, he quotes you!
      EV

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    3. ooh, ooh, it's only 6.99 on kindle! although i dislike kindle ever since amazon retracted "1984" from people's kindle libraries, and this is the kind of book that will eventually get "privished," the price is astonishingly high now. I bought it a week ago and it was $17.

      I also heard that Amazon is being pressured to stop selling fact-based history books about WWII at the behest of a certain demographic group, and I'd like to support Amazon to push back. We'll see how they react.
      EV

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    4. He quotes me? Now I need to see that. Can you excerpt that part?

      I saw that about Amazon and the push to eliminate sales of holocau$t realists.could become an important first amendment issue. It will be interesting to see how it turns out.

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    5. He quotes you in the context of criticism about evolution (although your quote was not about evolution):

      "When you find issues/controversies which people love to debate endlessly, which are emotionally inflammatory and which divide the masses into oppositional stances/groups, it is a pretty strong possibility that the controlling elites might be buy behind the scenes, fomenting these quarrels and keeping them alive." kennysideshow.blogspot.com 15th November 2011 (Hamer, 2013, p. 49)

      His point in this passage is that evolution and creationism are set up as artificial opposites to deflect attention away from a third option - that neither are true and that humanity's origins lies elsewhere.

      I do have some problems with his book - a second edition will hopefully have a reference section (and index). But he's self-published and that's difficult to do on a budget. I am learning somethings, but find others possibly apocryphal (the story about 'Sam Chang' and 'junk dna') or controversial (was Shakespeare really Christopher Marlowe or Edward deVere?). I find illogical his take on Harry Potter - am just reading the last book now to my kids - but that's really quibbling. Mostly it's great to have all this info in one place. Imagine a book that includes secular criticism of evolution, history, politics, modern medicine, the moon landing, etc. It's the book I would have written, if I could. I've not yet read the whole thing, but just knew that you would appreciate the book (and that was before I read your quote).
      Sincerely,
      EV

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    6. The quote is from this post which according to my link came from a comment at the Daily Bell. Since DB changed their website it looks like the comments on that particular post have disappeared.

      My post was linked on Rense at that time so that may be where Hamer ran across it. Too bad the book is now almost $25 in paperback but self-publishing is expensive and I see it is over 700 pages.

      Thanks

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    7. Hey Kenny,
      Do you ever check your mail anymore?
      EV

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  4. It appears the Chris Spivey site was suspended due to insufficient bandwidth, it was maybe too good.

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    1. He can always go with blogger or wordpress where bandwidth can't be used as an excuse. They'll have to come up with other ones.

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  5. The book "Dr. Mary's Monkey" is on my shelf, is scary as hell, and there is a good amount of information online to back up its claims. This one example of where people could collaborate... by buying a book like this and setting up a sharing mechanism or centralized lending library.

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